INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

IR250 THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE: RELATIONS AND PERCEPTIONS

Course Code: 3140250
METU Credit (Theoretical-Laboratory hours/week): 3(3-0)
ECTS Credit: 6.0
Language of Instruction: English
Level of Study: Undergraduate
Course Coordinator: Assoc.Prof.Dr. EBRU BOYAR
Offered Semester: Fall Semesters.

Course Objective

The aim of this course, which is thematically arranged, is to provide students with a clear understanding of Ottoman history and of the role of the Ottoman empire both regionally and within a wider context. It will also examine how the state managed its relations with the minorities within its own boundaries. The students will be encouraged to use primary material where possible and to think critically about the issues presented to them. The course will further provide students with the necessary historical background and understanding for courses within the Department of International Relations on the Middle East, the Balkans, Europe and Turkey.

Course Content

The aim of this course is to examine and understand the Ottoman Empire through its relations with different regions, such as Europe and the Indian Ocean, different states such as that of the Mamluks and Russia, and different ethnic and religious groups within its own territories such as the Greeks and the Shiites. Primary historical sources on the Ottoman Empire, such as Ottoman, Greek, Italian, French and English chronicles, travel accounts and published archival documents, will be given in translation. The students will thus able tu acquaint themselves with different historical sources and further develop their understanding of the Ottoman Empire.


Learning Outcomes

The students will be expected to have an understanding of Ottoman history and in particular of the relations between the empire and the neighbouring states. They will be expected to have an awareness of the central government policy in relation to religious minorities within the borders of the empire. The students will be encouraged to argue coherently and to construct their own interpretations of historical events.